What Web3 Can Learn From Web2?

The paradigm shift enabled by Web3, whether you define Web3 as blockchain-based or distributed-systems-based, is powerful. It tries to solve many of the problems Web2 created. Technology was the thing that was supposed to unlock power for everyone and connect the world. It has largely done that, but it also re-centralized problems.

The paradigm shift enabled by Web3, whether you define Web3 as blockchain-based or distributed-systems-based, is powerful. It tries to solve many of the problems Web2 created. Technology was the thing that was supposed to unlock power for everyone and connect the world. It has largely done that, but it also re-centralized problems.

Google, Facebook, and Amazon have hoarded data, sold data, and exposed a major flaw in the way we interact with the web—lack of privacy. As we rebuild the web through Web3, we don’t want to make the same mistakes as Web2. At the same time, it would be foolish not to understand and implement some of the things that made Web2 so freeing and so powerful. If we don’t, Web3 will essentially be built in a bunker that we can’t escape from.

The most important thing to avoid is isolation in the things built for Web3. What this means is that cool technology alone is never going to be adopted wide enough to solve the problems of Web2. It will only solve those problems for the select few already in the inner circle. How do we avoid that isolation, though? We do it by adopting something Web2 did very well, something humans have done since the dawn of mankind.

Communicate.

The first action ever taken on ARPANET in 1969, the infrastructure that would eventually become the internet that we know, was to send a message. To communicate. Since then, technology has advanced largely around enabling communication and connection. This is as true for technology before ARPANET as it has been for technology created in the last 15 years. The tools we have used over time to communicate have been refined, adapted, and improved. From carving petroglyphs on cave walls to painting entire stories on those same walls to writing text to printing text, communication has been at the core of many of the technological advances that helped shape humanity. This is not hyperbole. Apple would not be here today if it wasn’t for their ability to connect people. Social media, for all its flaws, rose from a desire to connect with other humans. Cell phones, text messaging, WiFi calling, video calls, remote conferences, and more are all examples of more recent technological advancements that were shaped around communication.

But even technology not specific to communication has long leveraged humanity’s desire to stay connected and be informed. eBay launched in 1995 as a tool to buy and sell goods. However, they soon realized they needed to be more than that to succeed. In 1998, they restructured around the idea that “eBay is a company that’s in the business of connecting people, not selling them things.”

And this leads us back to Web3. The space is still young (though not THAT young), but that’s not an excuse to ignore the fundamental idea that helps propel almost all business forward: communication. Yet, that’s exactly what’s happened thus far. Web3 has built systems that enable privacy but it has also locked people out. For example, a decentralized finance application today is NOT in the business of connecting people. They are in the business of optimizing smart contract code to deliver financial results. That’s all well and good, but it’s not going to be the thing that drives mass adoption. As eBay realized early on, connecting people is the only real way to ensure growth and adoption. And connection happens through communication.

The ability to connect people is the one thing Web2 got really right. We need to replicate that in Web3 but shaped around the Web3 ethos. That’s exactly what SimpleID is doing.

Samantha Brown

Author: Samantha Brown

A writer on SimpleId.

26 thoughts on “What Web3 Can Learn From Web2?”

  1. What this means is that cool technology alone is never going to be adopted wide enough to solve the problems of Web2. It will only solve those problems for the select few already in the inner circle. How do we avoid that isolation, though? We do it by adopting something Web2 did very well, something humans have.

    1. I completely agree, AlexW. It’s essential to learn from the mistakes of Web2 and strive for inclusivity in Web3. Technology alone cannot solve all the problems, but by implementing the aspects that made Web2 powerful and combining it with the advancements of Web3, we have a chance to create a more accessible and decentralized web for everyone.

  2. What are some specific things from Web2 that Web3 should adopt to avoid isolation?

    1. Web3 should adopt user-centric design principles, such as intuitive interfaces and seamless user experiences. By prioritizing user needs and preferences, Web3 can ensure wider adoption and avoid isolation. Additionally, embracing the concept of network effects and fostering a thriving developer community, like Web2 did, will help Web3 grow and evolve. It’s crucial to strike a balance between innovation and familiarity to create a more inclusive and accessible web for everyone.

  3. Web3 has the potential to fix many of the issues caused by Web2. The centralized nature of technology giants like Google, Facebook, and Amazon has led to a lack of privacy. Web3 should avoid making the same mistakes while also incorporating the empowering aspects of Web2. It’s important to ensure that Web3 is widely adopted and doesn’t isolate a select few.

  4. I totally agree with the author’s opinion. Web2 has indeed created privacy issues and re-centralized problems. We should learn from the mistakes of Web2 and ensure that Web3 prioritizes privacy and avoids isolation. At the same time, we should also incorporate some of the empowering aspects of Web2. It’s important to strike a balance between the two to create a more inclusive and powerful web.

    1. Web3 can ensure privacy by leveraging advanced encryption techniques and decentralized identity solutions. By implementing strong encryption protocols and incorporating privacy-focused features, Web3 can offer users a greater level of control over their personal data. Additionally, Web3 can learn from the mistakes of Web2 and prioritize privacy by default, rather than seeing it as an afterthought. It’s important to strike a balance between powerful features and protecting user privacy, and Web3 has the potential to achieve this.

  5. The paradigm shift enabled by Web3, whether you define Web3 as blockchain-based or distributed-systems-based, is powerful. It tries to solve many of the problems Web2 created. Technology was supposed to unlock power for everyone and connect the world. It has largely done that, but it has also re-centralized problems.

  6. Web3 holds great promise in solving the problems created by Web2, particularly the lack of privacy caused by the monopolization of data by tech giants like Google, Facebook, and Amazon. However, we should also learn from Web2’s successes in order to build a more inclusive and powerful Web3. We must avoid isolation and ensure that the benefits of Web3 reach a wider audience. Only then can we truly overcome the challenges of Web2 and create a better internet for all.

    1. Web3 can avoid isolation and ensure wide adoption by prioritizing user experience and usability. One of the key factors that made Web2 so powerful was its intuitive design and ease of use. If Web3 can make complex technologies like blockchain more user-friendly and accessible to the general public, it can bridge the gap between the inner circle and the wider audience. Additionally, education and outreach programs can play a crucial role in promoting awareness and understanding of Web3 among the masses. By focusing on both technology and user-centric approaches, Web3 can overcome isolation and achieve widespread adoption.

  7. Do you think Web3 has the potential to effectively address the privacy concerns of Web2 while also offering the benefits of connectivity and power?

    1. Yes, Sarah_WebEnthusiast, Web3 has the potential to effectively address the privacy concerns of Web2 while also offering the benefits of connectivity and power. With its decentralized nature and focus on data ownership and control, Web3 aims to restore privacy and empower individuals. By implementing robust encryption, secure identity solutions, and transparent data governance, Web3 can ensure that privacy is not compromised while still facilitating connectivity and unleashing the power of technology. It’s an exciting time for the web!

  8. I totally agree with this article. Web3 has the potential to address the issues created by Web2 and provide more privacy and security. However, it is crucial that we also learn from the successes of Web2 and ensure that Web3 is inclusive and accessible to a wider audience. Otherwise, we will just be creating another isolated system.

  9. Web3 has the potential to solve many of the problems created by Web2. However, we should not forget the lessons learned from Web2. Let’s not isolate ourselves and instead learn from the things that made Web2 powerful. Only then can we truly address the issues of Web2 for a wider audience.

  10. The paradigm shift enabled by Web3, whether you define Web3 as blockchain-based or distributed-systems-based, is powerful. It tries to solve many of the problems Web2 created. Technology was the thing that was supposed to unlock power for everyone and connect the world. It has largely done that, but it also re-centralized problems.
    Google, Facebook, and Amazon have hoarded data, sold data, and exposed a major flaw in the way we interact with the web—lack of privacy. As we rebuild the web through Web3, we don’t want to make the same mistakes as Web2. At the same time, it would be foolish not to understand and implement some of the things that made Web2 so freeing and so powerful. If we don’t, Web3 will essentially be built in a bunker that we can’t escape from.
    The most important thing to avoid is isolation in the things built for Web3. What this means is that cool technology alone is never going to be adopted wide enough to solve the problems of Web2. It will only solve those problems for the select few already in the inner circle. How do we avoid that isolation, though? We do it by adopting something Web2 did very well, something humans have been persistently seeking throughout history – unity and collaboration.

    1. Hi SarahDoe, I completely agree with you. The paradigm shift brought by Web3 is indeed powerful in tackling the problems created by Web2. While technology has connected the world, it has also resulted in the re-centralization of problems and lack of privacy due to data hoarding and selling by companies like Google, Facebook, and Amazon. As we rebuild the web with Web3, it is crucial that we learn from the mistakes of Web2. However, we should also acknowledge and incorporate some of the empowering aspects of Web2. It would be unwise to ignore the factors that made Web2 so influential and liberating. By doing so, we risk building Web3 in isolation, limiting its potential impact. To avoid this, we should adopt one of the key strengths of Web2 – unity and collaboration. These qualities have been sought after by humans throughout history and can help prevent isolation in the development of Web3. Let’s build a more inclusive and interconnected web for everyone.

  11. I think the paradigm shift enabled by Web3 is a powerful one. It attempts to address the issues that Web2 created. Technology was meant to empower everyone and connect the world, and it has achieved that to a large extent. However, it has also brought about the centralization of problems. Google, Facebook, and Amazon have accumulated and sold data, exposing the lack of privacy on the web. As we rebuild the web with Web3, we need to learn from the mistakes of Web2 while also incorporating the elements that made it successful. If we don’t, Web3 will be confined and inaccessible.

  12. I believe that the shift from Web2 to Web3 brings great potential. It aims to address the problems that Web2 has caused and provide solutions. Technology was meant to empower and connect us all, but it has also centralized problems. Companies like Google, Facebook, and Amazon have exploited our data and undermined privacy. As we rebuild the web with Web3, we must learn from the mistakes of Web2 while embracing the freedom and power that it offered. We should avoid isolating ourselves and ensure that Web3 benefits a wider audience, not just a privileged few.

  13. I strongly believe that Web3 can learn a lot from Web2. The shift enabled by Web3 is powerful and it addresses many of the problems created by Web2. However, we shouldn’t completely disregard the aspects that made Web2 so successful. We need to find a balance between privacy and freedom, and ensure that Web3 doesn’t isolate itself from the wider audience.

  14. What an insightful article! I completely agree that Web3 should learn from the mistakes of Web2 and prioritize privacy. However, it’s also crucial to leverage the strengths of Web2 to make Web3 powerful and accessible to a wider audience. Isolation is a major concern, and adopting inclusivity like Web2 did can help address this issue. Great read!

  15. Great article! How can Web3 ensure privacy while still benefiting from the freedom and power of Web2?

    1. Hi Justin21, thanks for your comment! Ensuring privacy while still harnessing the freedom and power of Web2 is indeed a crucial challenge for Web3. One approach can be to implement decentralized identity solutions, where users have control over their own data. By leveraging technologies like zero-knowledge proofs and encryption, Web3 can provide strong privacy guarantees without compromising the benefits of Web2. It’s a delicate balancing act, but one that Web3 developers and communities are actively working on.

  16. Web3 has the potential to learn a lot from Web2, especially in terms of privacy. Web2 giants like Google, Facebook, and Amazon have proven that lack of privacy is a major flaw in our interaction with the web. As we move forward with Web3, let’s not repeat those mistakes. However, we should also not ignore the aspects of Web2 that made it so powerful and liberating. Finding the right balance is crucial for the success of Web3.

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